Lance Smith

Has coached athletes to national and international medals in sprints, high jump, long jump, triple jump, middle distance, hurdles and steeplechase. 

Philosophy: coach and athlete is a team, with the athlete team captain, i.e. it is an athlete centred coaching philosophy.

Values: based on producing winners – but winning is not necessarily coming first – it’s athletes pushing their own boundaries, learning about themselves, developing commitment, learning to work together (team), facing and accepting challenges.    

Qualifications: IAAF Academy Elite Coach (Jumps – only 3 in NZ with this qualification); ANZ Level 3 in sprints, distance track, distance cross-country & road, high jump & horizontal jumps. 

Ages: 12+ will help younger ones on basic skills but will not set programmes or prescribe regular training regime.

Events: Sprints, middle distance to marathon (track, cross-country, road) plus all jumps.

Southland Coach of the Year 2012, been  and has been team coach or team manager to number of N.Z. teams overseas. So far has coached 19 Southland athletes to representing New Zealand.  (Oceania, World Juniors, Commonwealth Youth and World Mountain Championships).

Has coached athletes to national and international medals in sprints, high jump, long jump, triple jump, middle distance, hurdles and steeplechase. 

Philosophy: coach and athlete is a team, with the athlete team captain, i.e. it is an athlete centred coaching philosophy.

Values: based on producing winners – but winning is not necessarily coming first – it’s athletes pushing their own boundaries, learning about themselves, developing commitment, learning to work together (team), facing and accepting challenges.    

Qualifications: IAAF Academy Elite Coach (Jumps – only 3 in NZ with this qualification); ANZ Level 3 in sprints, distance track, distance cross-country & road, high jump & horizontal jumps. 

Ages: 12+ will help younger ones on basic skills but will not set programmes or prescribe regular training regime.

Events: Sprints, middle distance to marathon (track, cross-country, road) plus all jumps.

Southland Coach of the Year 2012, been  and has been team coach or team manager to number of N.Z. teams overseas. So far has coached 19 Southland athletes to representing New Zealand.  (Oceania, World Juniors, Commonwealth Youth and World Mountain Championships).

Contact:

lance.debbie@xtra.co.nz

Changing Coaches

There is a correct procedure when an athlete wants to change coach.

Please, make sure you follow it.
If, as an athlete you wish to change coaches, there is a correct way of doing it.

For Athletes.
1. Discuss your intent with your existing coach. Do this first. Don’t just up and leave. Talk through the options if necessary.
2. If feasible it would be beneficial if existing and intending coaches discussed the move – the more the new coach knows about you the better will be the coaching.
3. Make sure the coaching group you want to join has room for you – do not make assumptions that you will be accepted or burn your bridges before a new coaching set up has been formalised.
4. Do you know the coaching philosophy of the new coach? Are you sure the move will be the right one? It’s too late once you have made the move to discover the fit isn’t right.

For Coaches
1. Do not under any circumstances approach an athlete you know is coached by someone else with an invitation to join your squad.
2. If an athlete approaches you, make sure he or she has talked it over with the existing coach.
3. Consider carefully whether the new athlete will fit into your squad. Will existing squad members be comfortable? You do not want to upset the dynamics of a successful training group, because as we all know, the social aspect of a training squad is a key motivation.

Ricky Gutsell

          

I come from a background of being a competitive sports person, playing rugby, cricket and athletics during my schooling years.

Upon retirement from rugby and Cricket I took on the more serious side of running, competing in middle distance through to Marathon events, albeit with moderate success.

I would like to give back to the sport what it has given me over the years; therefore coaching aspiring young and old athletes seems like the best way to do this. 

My simple philosophy is, train hard, train smart, and let your feet do the talking.

Success is gauged by the eye of the beholder, whether it’s from achieving personal goals to receiving national recognition.

Winters Training nights are Tuesdays/Thursdays 5.30pm from Gore showground’s (please bring Hi Viz)

For more information

Ricky Gutsell

027 497 2517